Hi Folks!

Come listen to me, and three great ladies, speak at the Stonecrest Library this Saturday afternoon. I’ve detailed below the Who, What, Where, Why and When.

I’ll be going over the three marketing budgets included in our book, 100 Small Fires To Make Your Book Sales BLAZE!, and will discuss marketing tips and tricks for small, medium and large budgets.

Don’t worry, attending the workshop is definitely in your budget, not matter what its size as… it’s FREE!

Looking forward to seeing you there!


BTW, if you haven’t heard, the Second Edition of 100 Small Fires is out in paperback, and is a perfect Christmas gift for all the writers on your list. At $7.99 it won’t set your budget back either.

Find it here:

100 Small Fires at Amazon


WHAT: *The Ups and Downs of Writing Children’s Books
A Workshop For Childrens Book Authors (And Everyone Else)*
WHEN: DECEMBER 12/12/2015, BETWEEN 1pm and 3:00
WHERE: Stonecrest Library, 3123 Klondike Rd, Lithonia, GA 30038
Phone:(770) 482-3828
WHO: WORKSHOP SPEAKERS: Connie Fleming, Nancy Craddock, Lynn Coulter and TK Read

SPEAKER/TOPIC: Connie Fleming: Walking on the Edge: Conflict in Children’s Writing
A former UCR Crime Analyst with Georgia Bureau of Investigation, she now spends her days, and nights writing, illustrating, and speaking at schools, libraries and churches. Into every life must come some conflict. And no story is complete without it. Learn how to insert the right amount of tension to move your story forward.
As a very health-conscious senior adult she also writes about wiping out obesity, with a healthy dose of her own brand of humor and Christian wisdom.
Her website is and her weight-loss blog can be found at

SPEAKER/TOPIC: Nancy Craddock: Warnings from a Self-Pubbed Author
If you’re thinking about self-publishing, you can save yourself a lot of angst (and money) from someone who did it all wrong!
Feeling as if she’s always been peering over the top of an open book, Nancy is a keen observer of life. Each chapter of her own life has been centered around books, schools and libraries. As a child, Nancy’s happiest days were either playing “school” or “library” with a neighborhood friend. As an adult, she’s diligently worked to foster a life-long love of books in elementary students from Baton Rouge, LA and Houston, TX, to Atlanta, GA. Whether her students were a diverse group in a inner-city school, wealthy children of cattle barons or the sons and daughters of hard-working middle class parents in the suburbs, Nancy learned that shared laughter is always a unifying factor in any classroom and a humorous children’s book was never far from her reach.
Writing contests, magazine articles and hand-written notes, emails and long distant phone calls from editors will always be a thrill but Nancy is quick to say that she gauges her success by timid youngsters who’s whose eyes barely meet hers when they say “I like your book” at various book events. That is all the proof she needs to know her life has been, and continues to be, the most fabulous fairy tale she could ever imagine. Her website is

SPEAKER/TOPIC: Lynn Coulter: Make Money By Writing Nonfiction
Even if your goal is to publish a novel, you can earn money writing nonfiction books and articles while you work on it. The Web, for example, consumes enormous amounts of information, and someone has to write that content. Why shouldn’t it be you? Learn how to break into print and digital publications for children and adults with freelancer and author Lynn Coulter.
Lynn Coulter writes for

She’s also a freelancer with a B.A. in Journalism and the author of 3 books: Gardening with Heirloom Seeds; Mustard Seeds: Thoughts on the Nature of God and Faith (Publisher’s Weekly starred review); and Little Mercies: Celebrating God’s Everyday Grace and Goodness. Lynn has served as a contributing editor for Delta Sky and U.S. Airways Magazine, and she’s written for Ranger Rick, Southern Living, Jack and Jill, Delta’s Sky 4 Kids, Pockets, The Home Depot Garden Club, Southern Living, AAA Traveler and other publications. Currently she’s writing a novel for middle-grade readers with the help of her loyal office assistants/rescue dogs, Miss Paws and Molly. Her website is

TK Read: Light Fires Beneath Your Book Sales
Whether you’re self-pubbed, indie-pubbed, or traditionally pubbed, you need to market your book to make sure your sales soar! Learn promotion tips and tricks, and the best place to put your marketing efforts and dollars from TK. We’ll go over promotion ideas for small, medium, and large budgets!
TK is an attorney by day and a writes in the wee hours of the morning. She downs coffee and chocolate, and pens young adult thrillers and middle grade fantasies. A life-long student, she also signs up for every class she can fit in her schedule – that way when her teens are going on-and-on about their tough courses, she can match them moan-for-moan. TK co-authored the book, 100 Small Fires to Make Your Book Sales Blaze! with her marketing whiz sister, Kathleen Vrona. You can check the book out at and TK out at

** This event is free to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Thank you Cathy C. Hall!

Our good friend and fellow SCBWI Southern-Breeze member was kind enough to post an article about our book give away! Read it here:

Be sure and get our book while it’s FREE! Now through Wednesday.

Authors, do you have a marketing strategy, technique, plan, idea or mechanism that produced great results?

Share it with us, and we’ll share it with the writing community in our second edition, to be published in Kindle and paper form in late summer of this year. We’ll give you a shout-out and link to your author’s page!

Here’s to lighting fires under your writing AND your marketing!


Weeeee’re Back! It’s Our Annual Book Give away! Get it for Free 3/7 to 3/18!

Authors! To honor Springmingle (Southern Breeze’s spring writing conference), we will be giving away our marketing book, 100 Small Fires to Make Your Book Sales BLAZE!, for FREE between 3/14 and 3/18. Simply go to Amazon in that time period and download! The book has marketing tips with timelines and budgets for both self pubbed and traditionally pubbed authors.

On a related note, if you are an author with a marketing tip that worked for you and you care to share, email me ( We will be pubbing a Second Edition this summer and we may include a cite to you and your amazing idea, AND (drum roll, please)… a link to your author page!

Please share this post with anyone and everyone. For more info check out the link below.


For more on Springmingle, check it out here:

Authors Light a Fire at the Olde Town Conyers Fall Festival!

Four local authors of books for children and teens, Nancy Cadle Craddock, C.M. Fleming, Mary Ann Rodman and Susan Rosson Spain, will be selling and signing their works from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on October 25, 2014, during Conyers’ 38th Annual Fall Festival.
The featured publications provide quality choices for readers of all ages, ranging from early picture books through chapter books and novels for young adults. Several of the books earned national awards such as the Charlotte Zolotow Award for best picture book published in the United states (Rodman’s My Best Friend), as well as starred reviews in publications such as the American Library Association’s Booklist (Spain’s The Deep Cut), and Kirkus Reviews (Rodman’s Jimmy’s Stars).
Sponsored by local attorney T.K. Read, the authors’ table will be located outside the Read Building at 915 Commercial Street in Olde Town Conyers, and will also feature hourly drawings for free books. For more information, email T.K. Read at, or call (770) 653-6236.


When you’re a marketer, you have your own perception of time – you’re always seeing ahead, and trying to sell people what they don’t need today or tomorrow, but what they’ll need months from now. In today’s climate, book authors are marketers too, and need to incorporate these strategies in their marketing platforms.

Fact: This year, Target, BJs and other major retail stores put out their first glossy Xmas advertising circulars, BEFORE Halloween.

Fact: This year, marketing pundits began touting trends for 2014, BEFORE the school year started in some states.

Let’s look at some of these projections to see what we can take-away so we can hit the ground running in 2014.


Use of social media and interactive marketing has moved from a little something extra to a mandatory component of every marketing campaign. Some current predictions tag social media campaigns as the major component of next year’s marketing budget.

Take-away: You can no longer put-off building your social media platform. Establish a presence on at least three social media sites, say Facebook, Pinterest and Google+, NOW!


As pointed out by several pundits, our society is becoming less and less patient, so much so that today’s social media sound bites are being replaced by their younger, quicker cousins. Twitter’s Vine and Instagram’s video sharing feature are examples of the move from 120 character posts to sentence bites and from three minute Youtube videos to 15 seconds video bullets.

Take-way: You have less time to capture your audience and sell your product.


Citing the tremendous growth in user numbers, the pundits state 2014 is the year Google+ emerges as either a serious contender to Facebook or becomes the market dominator.

Take-way: Get on Google+ NOW! If you are already on it, update and upgrade your presence.

In contrast, according to Statista*, Facebook is the primary driver of website traffic to publishers, with Pinterest a not very close second, Twitter a distant third, and Google+ last behind LinkedIn. This obvious disconnect between future predictions and the current reality may be connected to the belief that Google should be able to figure out how to get Google+ members clicking on content.


In an A Sneak Peek at 2014 Marketing Trends and Other Hot Topics from the Marketing Forum Conference, Forbes Contributor Kimberly Whitler cites from two conference speakers regarding some trends showing consumer backlash in response to over-digitalization.

– There is a movement away from digital purchases to buy original products, like vinyl records and old cars. Rohit Bhargava,

– The importance of non-digital word of mouth (WOM) marketing. For WOM marketing to work, you must have a credible social component that motivates consumers to share. Example, Oscar Meyer’s “Baconbarter” campaign where comedian Josh Senkey used bacon to barter for his travel across the US.

For every movement, there is a counter-movement, and one where the nostalgia for the “good old days,” when people talked directly to each other instead of tweeting or texting or emailing, has gathered momentum. Henry Grabar, a columnist for who writes about how technological innovation impacts urban development, says, “In situations where politeness and concentration are expected, backlash is mounting against our smartphones.” According to Grabar, people have begun to carve out spaces and events as wire-free zones and activities.

Take-way: Tap into readers’ increasing nostalgia by publishing your Ebook as print book too. Do it, NOW! With print-on-demand there’s little-to-no associated cost. Establish incentives for readers to share in your marketing. For example, have a buy-one- get-one-free- to- share campaign that rewards readers when they give away copies of your book. Create social component marketing by supporting causes you believe in with free books for giveaways, or other donated items. Do not undervalue the personal touch in your marketing efforts.

More-than-ever, we live in a world with 24/7 social contact and marketing opportunities. Writers can light a fire under their personal brand by dedicating some time every day on marketing, with emphasis on social media, while not neglecting their home base and WOM marketing. By examining trends in media dominance, writers can choose where to spend their time so that they reap the biggest pay-off.

Incorporate a few of the suggestions made here to help ensure your success in 2014!

For more reading, click below:

The Top 7 Social Media Marketing Trends That Will Dominate 2014, Jayson Demers, Contributor.

Social Marketing Trends to Watch in 2014, Chris McMurphy.

A Sneak Peek at 2014 Marketing Trends and Other Hot Topics from the Marketing Forum Conference, Kimberly Whitler.

Pinterest Drives More Traffic to Publishers than Twitter, Felix Richter.

Smart Phones Are Killing Us — And Disrupting Public Life, Henry Grabar.

Pitch Perfect

More stories from the front lines of book marketing!  In this blog entry, we are going to share our experience getting reviews for our book “100 Small Fires to Make Your Book Sales Blaze” and how we crafted a creative “pitch” to get reviewers attention.  We will break down the actual pitch e-mail we used and one Top 100 Amazon Reviewers response to our solicitation.  Here’s a hint:  the reviewer liked our pitch enough to comment on it in the actual book review!

First however, we want to make an important, and often overlooked, point about reviews.  Most blogs/book marketing experts cover the basics when expounding on this subject.  They will tell you that book reviews are important to [inexpensively] build buzz and awareness for your book as well as to help customers make decisions when presented with similar choices.  All true.  But what most articles covering this topic don’t tell you is something we learned during the research for our book; book reviews are also needed to leverage some key marketing opportunities.  For example, to get your book listed on the “Top 100 Best Free Kindle Books” list (a promotional opportunity you can use during your Kindle FREE days promotion) you need a minimum of 13+ reviews and a 4.0 rating on Amazon.

Now back to the original point; how did we use a creative pitch to get our book noticed by some of Amazons Top Reviewers? (Note: you can find the list of reviewers at

We started with an attention grabbing headline.  Soliciting a review is similar to making a pitch to the media.  You need to capture their attention, their imagination, or even their sympathies.  We went for all three!

Here is the attention grabbing proclamation we used in the e-mail subject line for the pitch that grabbed the attention of one Amazon reviewer:

The future of literature is in your hands… kidding

Dramatic?  Yes, but that’s sort of the point.  We wanted the headline to suggest a higher purpose for book reviews.  Yes, it’s a dramatic way of conveying the idea that book reviews play a critical role in the success of a book, but we truly believe that reviewers can have a big impact.  If you are authentic and passionate in your appeal, then a bit of drama may just hit the mark. The key is to strike the right balance.

Now, lets take a close look at the body of the pitch e-mail. We added comments below {in red} to highlight some of the key points/strategies we used in the pitch.

Our e-mail opened with what we hoped was a thought provoking quote that again, suggested a higher purpose for book reviews.

“The future of literature is in the ability of authors to promote themselves and their books…otherwise, we will be subjected to whatever literature the Big Six publishing houses deem good for our health”….Kathleen Vrona

Hello (book reviewer name);

I got your name from the list of Amazon Top Reviewers….of course.  And I must say your rating system is a bit intimidating (and the fact that you have degrees in Astronomy and CS)….but here goes anyway. {make sure to read the reviewers bio, interests, and review policy.  Then call out something that’s relevant to you or your pitch and let them know you took the time to read their information}

As an avid reader (and intellect), you are someone who cares about good literature therefore, I’m hoping you will review my book “100 Small Fires to Make Your Book Sales Blaze….”   Now HEAR ME OUT ON THIS before you hit the delete key!  {a little begging never hurt}

You know how hard it is for new authors to get noticed…that’s why they desperately send e-mails to strangers similar to this one. {try a little humor too in your pitch}

But those poor authors books will never see the light of day unless my book sees the light of day.  Such is the irony of book marketing.  {blatant appeal to the reviewers sympathies? You bet.  Again, be authentic.  T.K and I wrote this book because we don’t want to see good books go unnoticed at the same time that Snooki’s life story is a best seller. So, we channeled this passion and leveraged as an angle to get the reviewers attention}

You see, my book is called “100 Small Fires to Make Your Book Sales Blaze…” and it offers 100 powerful ideas for marketing/promoting a book written by someone who markets for a Fortune 100 company…that someone is me.  In addition to being a marketing expert, however, I am also a book lover who wants new authors to have a chance to get their “masterpieces” noticed.  {in our book “100 Small Fires” we talk about using your story as part of the pitch if there is something in your background that is unique and relevant.  We used the fact that I’m I’m a professional marketer and T.K. is a writer and together, we created a unique view of book marketing not found in other books covering this topic}

It’s a tough market out there and authors need to use the latest marketing tactics to build awareness for their books.  I was helping my sister market her first book and noticed that most book marketing self-help tomes were written by writers, not professional marketers.  This book is different and offers really creative ideas for authors but will never be found by the ones who need it most unless I can get reviews. So there is the irony: this book will help authors escape from obscurity and oblivion but will fall into obscurity and oblivion before it can be of any help to anyone if it isn’t reviewed. 

Please let me know if you are interested in reading our book (co-authored by my sister, the real writer in the family) and providing a review on Amazon.  I will follow up promptly with a complimentary copy to your e-mail box.  {be specific in your request}

If you are interested, you can find more information at

Or check out the book on Amazon here {make sure to use a service like Tiny URL or Bitly to shorten the link to your Amazon page}

Thanks in advance for your kind consideration….Sincerely, Kathleen Vrona (hailing from KY, the land of horses, The Kentucky Derby, bourbon whiskey and Louisville Slugger bats)  {humanize your approach and add something personal about yourself so your pitch doesn’t sound like a form letter.  Amazon reviewers often share personal details about themselves in their Amazon profiles.  You should do the same}

Below is the response we got from one Amazon Top Reviewer who received the review request above.  This is an excerpt from the actual review. To see the full review, go to look for the review by E. A. Lovitt.


……The wave has arrived and those of us who want our books read and admired need to figure out how to make them float to the top where they will be noticed by the reading public. “100 Small Fires to Make Your Book Sales BLAZE!” is the lifebelt your book will need in this strange and scary new world of warp-speed publishing…….

……I was hoping to publish my novel and let it float to the top on its own merits, but as one of Amazon’s top 100 reviewers I already knew that wasn’t going to work even before I read ‘100 Small Fires.’ I get multiple requests for reviews every day from authors who want to publicize their new books. (By the way, Vrona and Read wrote one of the best review requests I’ve ever received). How am I going to compete with the other new authors for readers? ‘100 Small Fires’ answers that question, but it involves lots of hard work–maybe more work than it took to write my book in the first place……


Ok, full disclosure time.  We are just getting starting in our effort to seek reviews.  As of the date we published this blog article, we only had 8 reviews.  But we got really excited with this early success so we wanted to share it with you.  While we may not be “pitch perfect” yet, the review above tells us that we hit the right note with this pitch.

Check in with us later this month when we will be blogging about how we leveraged our FREE DAYS promotion to get over 800 downloads of our book in two days.


Whew! We got there!


Spouses, siblings, parents, significant others of writers or anyone within six degrees of a writer, your loved one or friend needs marketing help!

Writers: Are you self-pubbed, indie-pubbed, traditionally-pubbed, crowd-sourced, rock- etched, or hair-woven – news flash – you need marketing help!

Now, the good news…

Marketing help is a few clicks away, and… it won’t break bank.

100 Small Fires to Make Your Book Sales BLAZE! is now in it’s second edition, updated and fully revised, and…

$2.99 for the ebook, or $7.29 for the paperbook; that’s less than a cup of plain Joe from McDonald’s or a super large, super fancy, whatever-your-poison.

Get them here:


100 Small Fires eBook at Amazon


100 Small Fires Paperback at Amazon

Happy Holidays!

TK Read

Well, our free days have been a rousing success so far.  Today we’ve been #1 in our category at Amazon, and we’ve got the screen shots to prove it! See one below:

We made it to #1 in our category on Amazon.

We made it to #1 in our category on Amazon.

If you haven’t had a chance to download the book, do it now! Our free days end at midnight Pacific time. See above for the page with the download link.

Visit us later in the week for the strategies we used to get there.


YA and MG Authors Should Get Their Game On to Fire-up Book Sales.

With it being Super Bowl Sunday, it’s a great time to discuss the type of games that are relevant to writers.

“Gamification” simply means to make a product or marketing campaign interactive and engaging by adding game design elements to it.  The goal is to create customer engagement in a particular activity, like watching for clues in your book trailer, while winning their loyalty. *The use of games can, but does not have to, include contests and the awarding of prizes; but where you chose to do so, make sure you are not violating any state or federal laws. Generally, you cannot require a purchase to enter such a contest. *

YA or Young Adult is typically (and very loosely) defined as a book whose target market is 11-19 year olds. MG or Middle Grade is generally written for children between 9 and 13. In reality, and as seen by sales for blockbusters like The Hunger Games and the Harry Potter series, all age groups read books written for these markets.  For more on what makes a book YA or MG, read author Joanna Penn’s excellent blog article on the subject here:

So why should writers for these markets focus their publicity strategies on gamification?

Games are the interaction method of choice for  members of these markets. It’s safe to say that virtually all teens and children in the intended YA and MG markets have been exposed to, own, and/or play video games, computer games, games on their phones or other hand held devices.  Playing interactive games is a huge part of their lives. If you want a sure fire way to attract their attention, you need to gamify your book marketing.

For a great example of the engagement possibilities using gamification to attract middle grade readership, check out Author Sarah Prineas’ best-selling, The Magic Thief series. On her publisher’s book page, you’ll find links that let you explore the book setting through an interactive map, read one of the main’s character’s lost journal entries; obtain a recipe for biscuits eaten in the book, play a game where you learn what animal you’d become by casting a spell from the book, learn about sword fighting, down-load images from the books as your computer wallpaper, and decode ruins for a chance to win an exclusive incentive. Take a look here:

Whew! While that seems like a lot, Sarah went even farther in her gamification odyssey, and The Magic Thief has been made into an inter-active online game by Adventure Quest. Find it here:  For more on Sarah and her other books read here:

Erin Morgenstern’s best seller, The Night Circus, book launch was accompanied by a free on-line game developed by Failbetter Games. While there has been extensive on-line debate on whether the work should be classified as literary or YA, for our purposes we’re treating  it as YA because it has teen protagonists and is marketed to teenagers and adults. The game involves the books characters and story world. Here’s the link for the game:, and for Erin’s home page, click here: .

The game (along with great writing, strong publisher support and host of other factors) was instrumental in pushing The Night Circus to the top. It was a central component of an overall marketing strategy that won Erin’s publisher the “Best Marketing Campaign of the Year Award” from the Book Marketing Society.

If you want to keep abreast of book marketing trends, and gamification ideas, for your own marketing efforts, it pays to review the Book Marketing Society’s monthly awards as well. Start here:

You may be thinking, “Hey, I’m not a big publisher. What can I do to bring to gamification into my book marketing?”

Well, formulating your own strategy to engage readers through games doesn’t have to be expensive, complicated or time consuming. You can add the interactivity of a game to your Twitter, Facebook and Google+ listings without spending a great deal of money or time.  Here are some examples of how:

–          Run a Tweeting Contest:  Popular Mechanics Magazine recently featured a DVD giveaway where prizes were awarded to the first ten twitter users who posted a particular tweet on a specific date and time.  You too can do this!

–          Add Word Game Challenges to Your Social Media Sites. Run a one week crossword puzzle challenge. Change your profile pic to a shot of a cross word puzzle with a couple of letters already filled in. Make sure the word or phrase is an important one from your book, but not necessarily one that anyone could just guess.  Start an Event Page or comment line where you state your rules for your game, clearly and distinctly, including the number of winners, date and time contest begins and ends. Give clues throughout the week from this page/comment line. Have people email you’re their guesses to your designated email account and award the first so many a prize (bookmarks, magnets, signed copy, etc.).  Be sure to post notices of your contest to your blogs, twitter accounts (using appropriate hash tags), and other social media sites frequented by your readership at least one week before you begin your contest. Also, for the week of your contest, make sure you change your access perimeters to allow the public access to your Facebook or Google+ page so everyone who is interested can enter.

–          Add Free Games to Your Blog and Web Pages. If you have a bit of blog/website administration know-how, you can also add word puzzle games right to your homepage.  Eclipsecrossword allows you to download their crossword puzzle app for inclusion in your website for free. Find it at  For WordPress users, simply search “puzzles” in the Search Plugins menu and you will find more than a baker’s dozen word games that you can upload to your blog. Find one you like, and with a little imagination you can figure out a way to use it to interact with your visitors.

Now… Three. Two. One!


Get your game on!

For more ideas using Gamification to fire up your book marketing, you can also buy our book!

100 Small Fires To Make Your Book Sales BLAZE!

Find 100 Small Fires To Make Your Book Sales BLAZE! here:



Antic Advertising; You Know It When You See It

Antic Advertising; You Know It When You See It

By Kathleen Vrona

The dictionary definition of “antic” is:
-a playful trick or prank: caper
-a grotesque, fantastic, or ludicrous gesture, act or posture
-fantastic, odd, grotesque

Does this sound familiar to you?  Seen any advertising lately that fit the description above?

We coined the term “Antic Advertising” to describe an advertising campaign that is designed purely to attract the public’s attention and go viral. We were compelled to create a new term while researching “viral marketing” for our book, 100 Small Fires to Make Your Book Sales Blaze.  After weeks of researching viral marketing strategies, we concluded that it was time viral marketing underwent some stratification. These days, not everything labeled “viral marketing” really fits the bill.  In our opinion, viral marketing is a related but somewhat different strategy than Antic Advertising.  Viral marketing should be used to denote a marketing strategy that encourages people to pass along a marketing message or to share a product.  The campaign is still designed to go viral but involves a more thoughtful strategic approach with viral components seeded in the campaign.  A classic example of a viral marketing strategy is Hotmail.

Hotmail was one of the first free web based email services.   At the bottom of every free email message sent out was the tag line, “Get your private, free email at”  So, every time a user of Hotmail sent an email, the marketing message was spread.  Simple, but brilliant. And it wasn’t about getting attention or national media coverage with crazy stunts, it was about seeding the product with a viral component so it spread rapidly like a virus.  In our humble opinion, that’s the difference between viral marketing and Antic Advertising.

Another example of an effective viral marketing strategy is what companies like LeadsLeap, Simply Measured and even Google are doing; these companies offer free yet valuable interactive tools as a way to increase brand awareness and sales. The tools often include marketing messages and carry links to the companies web site.  Also, they may represent “lite” versions of a more robust tool so there is an opportunity to upsell the customer once they are hooked on the “free” version.

Interactive tools can be in the form of grading tools (see Hub Spots Web Site Grader), calculators, random word generators, surveys, assessments or tests.  The sky is truly the  limit. They can be the one thing that gets visitors to return to your web site again and again or refer their friends.  In other words, interactive tools are sometimes the best viral marketing opportunities because they are often shared.

So what is Antic Advertising?  Antic Advertising is about attracting attention–national media attention if you are really lucky–by doing or creating something incredibly random, hilarious, controversial, clever, interesting, dangerous, surreal, crazy, sexy, scary, cool (you get the idea).   In other words, doing anything it takes to get the public’s attention.  .

This type of advertising can be in the form of an event, video, text message, article or blog, or it can be a series or combination of these things.  Antic Advertising campaigns are typically not designed to sell products meaning there is no strong “call to action” during the ad; in some cases, the ads don’t even mention a product or service.  Many antic ads are actually one-off efforts and not part of a larger campaign or strategy.

Today, marketing antics have reached a new fever pitch.  The stakes keep getting higher, the bar keeps getting raised.  Take the recent Nike ads with NBA star Kobe Bryant as a perfect example; to advertise their new Hyperdunk shoes, the company launched a series of videos featuring Kobe jumping over a bunch of crazy things, including an Aston Martin and a pool of snakes.

The pace and overall feel of many antic ads is more maniacal, desperate and random than strategic.  And while many times these campaigns miss the mark–becoming so hilarious or ridiculous that no one is paying attention to the company or product–they can also be incredibly successful.  It can be the cheapest form of advertising if it works and writers are uniquely positioned to take advantage of this strategy because success can be enhanced by an innovative and creative approach.

An example of Antic Advertising done right– meaning less random or desperate and more strategic– is TNT’s “We Know Drama” campaign conducted on the streets of a small town in Belgium. The TV station put a red button on a pedestal in a quiet square with a sign above that read “Push to add drama”.  When someone pushes the button, an elaborate scene is played out in the square: an ambulance pulls up, sirens blare, the patient falls out of the back of the ambulance, two men start to fight each other, a bikini clad girl drives by on a motorcycle (ok, there is a little “random” in this one), more cars screech into the square, a gun battle ensues…you get the picture.  The subsequent video has become a viral success. Check it out for yourself here

Antic Advertising can be incredibly powerful because if done right (and it works) awareness for you or your brand can spread faster than any paid advertising campaign could hope to achieve. And the beauty is, the public is doing the spreading, not a high cost agency, so this type of advertising can be the most affordable form of advertising available today.

Can Antic Advertising work for promoting a book?  We think it can.  For the author struggling to get awareness for their book in a crowded market, it’s a potentially powerful opportunity, and one you should seriously consider.  Remember, however, that getting attention with a headline grabbing publicity stunt is only part of the battle, albeit arguably the hardest part.  After you have their attention, you need to know how to channel it into book sales. In marketing terms, you need to have a plan to engage the customer after you have their attention.

Now for the disclaimers. Will it work every time? No. Is it a gamble? Yes. There are no guarantees with this strategy; it can be hard to predict what will go viral.  Some Antic Advertising campaigns are wildly successful taking a company or product from relative obscurity to a household word overnight.  Others miss the mark entirely and sit in a dark corner of the web never seeing the light of day.  Is it worth a try?  We believe so. But be prepared to experiment, and if you can afford it, try a few different concepts.  Some will burn out but others may just start a blaze.

When thinking about creating an antic campaign, get creative.  Here are some ideas to spark “out of the box” thinking.

1. Create a mock interview: write a script for an interview and have a friend or journalism major interview you on video and put the interview on You Tube. Make it funny, random, outrageous and poke fun at what your book isn’t while at the same time, getting across what it is.

2. Create a mockumentary about reading as entertainment.  Compare it to other forms of entertainment (you could really go after reality television or the lack of narrative depth in other forms of entertainment) and make fun of the shortfalls while at the same time highlighting what’s great about reading as a past time.

3. Leverage or play off of famous campaigns that went viral like the “Will it Blend” Blendtec campaign. Blend your book on video and post to You Tube. Or play off the TNT campaign described above; hire drama students or members of your local community theatre to act out a scene from your book in a very public place. Make sure and create a video and distribute via your social media “outposts”.

4. Hold a contest for the best puppet skit of a scene from your book (ala the Potter Puppet Pals seen on You Tube), solicit input from the public and create a YouTube Channel just for these skits. Award a prize to the one that gets the most views.

5. Break a world record (if you are promoting a cookbook, bake the worlds’ largest pizza).

6. Organize a protest related to a theme in your book.  Or flip that idea on its head.  At a book signing event, pay people to stand in front of the book store and protest you.  Give them signs that say “Down with (your name).  His book made us think and it hurt our brains.”  You will probably get noticed. You may even get coverage from the local media.

When you get antic ad block, check out web sites like BuzzFeed, and Viral Video Chart to see what’s hot on the web and what’s going viral at any given time to get ideas.

If you are wondering if Antic Advertising is for you, keep in mind that writers have been pulling antics to get attention for centuries.  In the 2011 essay How Writers Build the Brand, author Tony Perrottet recounted several examples of how writers throughout history have conducted crazy stunts to promote their books including the following:

“Perhaps the most astonishing P.R. stunt — one that must inspire awe among authors today — was plotted in Paris in 1927 by Georges Simenon, the Belgian-born author of the Inspector Maigret novels. For 100,000 francs, the wildly prolific Simenon agreed to write an entire novel while suspended in a glass cage outside the Moulin Rouge nightclub for 72 hours. Members of the public would be invited to choose the novel’s characters, subject matter and title, while Simenon hammered out the pages on a typewriter. A newspaper advertisement promised the result would be “a record novel: record speed, record endurance and, dare we add, record talent!” It was a marketing coup. As Pierre Assouline notes in “Simenon: A Biography,” journalists in Paris “talked of nothing else.”

Our fore-authors were no different from us and wanted the same things that we do; to create something that gets the greatest amount of attention in the shortest period of time with the lowest cost.  Again, the key is to know what you are going to do once you have everyone’s attention.  How will you to turn that awareness into consideration for you and your book?

Find more book marketing and Antic Advertising ideas in 100 Small Fires To Make Your Book Sales BLAZE!.  Go here to order: